How Chanel reinvents its famous symbols in jewelry, fashion

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From fashion to decoration to jewelry, the French house is reinventing its sustainable emblems

Few luxury brands have as many instantly recognizable designs as Chanel. The genius of the house lies in the constant interpretation of its symbols – founder Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel’s favorite flower, color schemes and more – across categories. Here’s a look at six of her quirky symbols and how they’re translated from fashion to glamorous jewelry, watches, and a stunning boutique backdrop.

Feather

A feathered look from the Chanel Spring 2021 show by artistic director Virginie Viard evokes an 18k white gold Plume de Chanel bracelet with diamonds, $ 12,900.  All jewelry is available from London Jewelers.
A feathered look of ChanelThe spring 2021 show by artistic director Virginie Viard evokes a Plume de Chanel 18-karat white gold bracelet with diamonds, $ 12,900. All jewelry is available from London Jewelers.

A supple feather brooch encrusted with diamonds was part of Mademoiselle Chanel’s first and only high jewelry collection in 1932. The emblem took off at the fashion house. Today, extravagant feathered confections parade on its catwalks while the Plume de Chanel jewelry line seduces like the original pin.


Camellia

Claudia Schiffer's twin camellias (worn on a 1994 runway show, right) mirror 18k rose gold and diamond earrings from Chanel Extract de Camelia, $ 5,050.
Claudia Schiffer twin camellia mirror (worn in a 1994 runway show, right) Chanel Camelia Extract 18-karat rose gold diamond earrings, $ 5,050.

Pinned into her hair or tucked recklessly through a belt, Coco Chanel adored the simplicity of her favorite flower. Fashioned in silk, rendered in enamel or in diamonds and pearls, the camellia quickly became the icon of the house. A century later, the Camélia jewelry collection flourished, with varieties ranging from abstract to ornamental.


Two tones

Juxtapose this black and white look from the Spring 2021 collection (right) with Chanel's J12 Paradoxe watch (left) in ceramic and steel, $ 9,100.
Juxtapose this black and white look from the spring 2021 collection (right) with ChanelJ12 Paradoxe watch (left) in ceramic and steel, $ 9,100.

From dark suits edged in crisp white (or vice versa) to her famous two-tone slingbacks unveiled in 1957, Mademoiselle loved the contrast. Modern and graphic, the look is timeless. This is why it works so well in Chanel timepieces like the clean-lined J12 Paradoxe watch.


Quilting

The stitching on a pink quilted bag from the Chanel Spring 2021 collection is echoed in the brand's 18k yellow gold Coco Crush ring with diamonds, $ 7,750.
Sewing on a pink quilted bag from the Chanel The spring 2021 collection is featured in the brand’s 18k yellow gold Coco Crush ring with diamonds, $ 7,750.

Chanel’s famous 2.55 shoulder bags, launched in 1955, featured diamond-stitched quilting that is said to be inspired by men’s equestrian jackets. The house’s favorite treatment has extended to clothing and has been reflected since 2015 in its Coco Crush jewelry line. With crisscross incisions and slightly arched edges, this quilted is major.


Coromandal screen

In a photo taken in 1959 in her apartment on rue Cambon, Mademoiselle (right) is surrounded by her Coromandel screens.  A reproduction of one of them is the perfect backdrop for Chanel's new jewelry and watch show (left) at the flagship of London Jewelers in Manhasset.
In a photo taken in 1959 in her apartment on rue Cambon, Mademoiselle (right) is surrounded by her Coromandel screens. A reproduction of one is the perfect backdrop for Chanelnew jewelry and watch fair (left) at London Jewelers flagship store in Manhasset.

Chinese lacquer panels adorned with intricate scenes of flora and fauna. Over the years, its screens have inspired everything from the brand’s fine jewelry to a rich amber fragrance. Now, the new Chanel boutique in the flagship of London Jewelers is adorned with an exquisite reproduction.


Tape

Mademoiselle's trademark bow, seen here in a 1944 portrait (left), matches Chanel's 18k white gold Ruban ring with diamonds (far left), $ 6,600.
Mademoiselle’s trademark bow, seen here in a 1944 portrait (right), matches Chanel‘s Ruban ring in 18k white gold with diamonds (left), $ 6,600.
Chanel

Pretty as a gift, Mademoiselle Chanel would dress her hats and fascinators with large bows and sometimes garnish her tweed suits with small ones. It’s easy to tie one up with the Ruban collection, which explores the sinuous theme of precious metals and diamonds.



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