high school – Ohallo Ranco http://ohalloranco.com/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 12:06:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ohalloranco.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png high school – Ohallo Ranco http://ohalloranco.com/ 32 32 Head of Muslim World League meets Islamic Affairs Minister of Maldives https://ohalloranco.com/head-of-muslim-world-league-meets-islamic-affairs-minister-of-maldives/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 18:23:22 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/head-of-muslim-world-league-meets-islamic-affairs-minister-of-maldives/ JEDDAH: A nationwide art competition targeting school children was launched on Sunday by the Saudi Commission for Visual Arts and the Ministry of Education. “Artists of Tomorrow” is an opportunity for public and private education students from five regions of the Kingdom to express their talent and raise their skills. It is also a chance […]]]>

JEDDAH: A nationwide art competition targeting school children was launched on Sunday by the Saudi Commission for Visual Arts and the Ministry of Education.

“Artists of Tomorrow” is an opportunity for public and private education students from five regions of the Kingdom to express their talent and raise their skills.

It is also a chance for junior artists to receive direction and further explore how far they can go in the arts. It revolves around three areas: drawing and painting, sculpture and photography.

The competition aims to help young Saudi artists excel, grow and be seen. It also aims to raise awareness of the visual arts, motivate students to discover their artistic skills, and encourage students to engage in the creative mediums of the visual arts.

Commission CEO Dina Amin tweeted about the competition: “The #Artists of Tomorrow competition is a platform that will take us into an aesthetic world created by the imagination of our students, boys and girls. The competition aims to motivate students to enter various fields of visual arts.

Participation is restricted to individuals and each student may participate with more than one entry. Young artists are advised to include the contest title hashtag on their works #artists_of_tomorrow to ensure ownership.

Applicants must be elementary, middle or high school students between the ages of 6 and 18.

Each age group is invited to deliver a work of art related to a specific element, using their imagination, to create and design imaginary or real animals, superheroes or imagine Saudi cities in 2060.

Entries should be made in accordance with the general rules of public taste and the rules of Islamic law. They must not show prejudice or racism of any kind, nor be political in nature.

Contest organizers said entrants would be judged on certain criteria, including the idea for the artwork, innovation, process, applied artistic skills and aesthetic value.

Student artwork will be judged by a judging committee comprised of six visual arts experts experienced in evaluating student artwork and talented students.

Prizes include art kits, medals and the opportunity to display the work in a virtual exhibition. There will also be prizes for schools, jury and teachers.

The schools participating in the competition come from the following regions: Riyadh, Makkah, Eastern Province, Jazan and Baha.

The registration form is available on the official competition page: https://engage.moc.gov.sa/artists_of_tomorrow#section-hero.

“Artists of Tomorrow” is divided into three stages: registration, evaluation and announcement of the winners.

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To be black and resting on the body of the earth – Guernica https://ohalloranco.com/to-be-black-and-resting-on-the-body-of-the-earth-guernica/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 16:00:42 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/to-be-black-and-resting-on-the-body-of-the-earth-guernica/ when no sweetness came, we looked for fatigue in each other’s knees. Held by the fingertips, weaved a bed where one could dream. When no sweetness came, I cried in the shower and gave my anger to the sea. I forgot that I was not alone until the spirit of nine hundred and sixteen was […]]]>

when no sweetness came, we looked for fatigue in each other’s knees. Held by the fingertips, weaved a bed where one could dream. When no sweetness came, I cried in the shower and gave my anger to the sea. I forgot that I was not alone until the spirit of nine hundred and sixteen was come and push me to stay alive. Lying back on a moving horse, the character in your tapestry seems to be doing an impossible thing. I recognized it as I walked through the gallery – the tension and tenderness of seeking rest in a place swirling with its impossibility.

The black cowboys they show us in school, in movies and in magazines are upright, stoic. They gaze defiantly at us from grayscale photographs, demanding that we mark their presence in the messy expansionist histories of the so-called American West. Growing up, I never thought to ask if Bass Reeves ever got tired after long days chasing horse thieves and fighting over cattle on Chickasaw land. If Stagecoach Mary just wanted to lie next to the woman she’s driven a thousand miles for and never deliver mail again. Diedrick, I guess what I’m trying to say is that the image of the horse – in the visual arts, in the archives – sometimes seems irretrievably linked to a myth of masculinity and war, an imperative for action . That a horse’s back is so often the site of the most scripted discursive struggles for who we can be.

I am thinking here of Kehinde Wiley’s painting of a black Napoleon, a man dressed in durag on a rearing horse, preparing to lead invading armies across the Alps. I think of Kevin Quashie’s observations of black culture’s over-identification with a reductive and callous notion of public resistance, how it makes it so easy to ignore the complex power of our quiet, vulnerable moments. But when I saw your tapestry, something in my body landed in relief, stretched and unfolded in an imagined elsewhere.

There are no grand proclamations here, no stiff backs. The character in the tapestry could gallop into battle or race his friends to the lake, but he doesn’t have to tell us which. Secrets are allowed here. My black interior is allowed here. In the infinite space before the horse’s hooves hit the ground, our stubborn and incoherent inner selves are nursed, given the uncanny gift of new body shapes, new imaginings of posture, whispered lessons in a world that never let us stop moving.

During my years of equestrian teaching, I was familiarized with the doctrine of righteousness. The body was meant to be flexible and responsive; the lower back had to move organically with the rhythms of the horse’s gait. But always, shoulders back. Eyes up. No sag. Phrases repeated by many teachers – the raspy-voiced Long Island women who spent their days ferrying children to local horse shows, dry-cleaning outfits and lending clothes when parents were too busy; the college coach who, after registering me and a Thai teammate for an event, joked that she misses the good old days when surnames were easier to spell. But always, shoulders back. I mean, and I’m sure you know this, these institutions shape our frameworks. They have a vested interest in a stoic (black) back. They have charts and things about how a body should be.

Another thing about righteousness: the earliest occurrences of horseback riding as a sport in the western world were tied to the military. One of the oldest treatises on horse training, On horseback riding by the cavalry officer Xenophon, established dressage as a means of conditioning horses. Throughout the history of the British Empire, riding practices were created with the mounted soldier at their center. The American Equestrian Team was originally trained and managed by the military. I wonder what it means to me to shape my body within a lineage of male conquests, within a received tradition of earthbending and genderbending. To shape this scoliosis backbone, this twisted black self, this crazy. It exhausted. To imitate the postures of the soldiers who invade my ancestral lands, because there is a kind of security there, or so we are told. Right means productive. A good soldier is ready to kill.

When I saw the figure on horseback in your tapestry, I smiled to myself. Kinfolk is tired, and they’re not afraid to show it. They sleep? They dream ? Perhaps only in dream space could a small black child gallop across the world backwards, belly up, shoulders in sweet repose. From dream space to gallery space — a spell that transmutes the matter of this reality. A spell of what could be.

I recently reread Ntozake Shange’s Sassafras, Cypress & Indigo, a novel about three black sisters who grow up in a family of South Carolina weavers. Their mother and the women before her have woven clothes for the same white family since slavery, and now do so for money. The eldest daughter, Sassafrass, begins making artistic wall tapestries in high school, and her impractical form of weaving baffles her mother. Later, when Sassafrass weaves in front of her activist boyfriend, he berates her for not doing something to improve the black condition. Sassafrass sees visions as she weaves. She commune with spirits, finds moments of escape from her violent home (“because when women make clothes, they have time to think”). Through the tactile work of weaving, she shapes and remakes the material of her universe.

Diedrick, you said about the weaving on your loom that “even if you act on this machine, it also acts on you. There is so much room to extract these emotive qualities, lines and gestures from these simple threads. In your weaving, an embodied practice that harks back to crucial and undervalued black craft traditions, you reconfigure the possible. You give us time to think. When I stopped in front of your tapestry, when I left and when I came back, I felt the gift in my bones. When I look for a lineage in the long canon of mounted figures, centuries of statues of generals and oil paintings, I choose this child woven with bright green thread. Lying on their way to who knows where, beckoning, Listen, that’s how a body can be. Their horse with an unfinished tail and hanging threads, a haptic and imperfect vision of care.

Something I come back to every time I look at this piece is the sweet echo between the human figure and the horse. The curve of the child’s back imitating the horse’s neck and back, the call and response between the horse’s legs and the child’s hanging limbs. Much of the doctrine of righteousness resembles an ideology of separation. The fantasy of a white soldier taking his rightful place in dominating other living beings (including the one who carries him into battle). A colonial project to put things in their place. A theory of conquest. But here, the bodies of the horse and the rider are in concert. It’s normal to surrender to what carries you. It’s normal to be transported, to be tired and confident in the presence of the other. Seeing the movement of the horse and the gentle stillness of the child and the frayed, knotted edges of the earth they traverse, I recall a line written by ecologist and somatic thinker Jeanine M. Canty: “I am a body on the body of the earth.”

How glorious it is to be black and resting on the body of the earth.

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For 77 years, one of Colorado’s oldest ski shops is also its most colorful | Way of life https://ohalloranco.com/for-77-years-one-of-colorados-oldest-ski-shops-is-also-its-most-colorful-way-of-life/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/for-77-years-one-of-colorados-oldest-ski-shops-is-also-its-most-colorful-way-of-life/ Bill’s Ski Rentals has been a mainstay in Leadville for 77 years. Paul Copper took over the shop from his father and continues to run it. (Video by Skyler Ballard) LEADVILLE • The twenties enter the store several hours late. Denver traffic was horrible, they say. […]]]>



Bill’s Ski Rentals has been a mainstay in Leadville for 77 years. Paul Copper took over the shop from his father and continues to run it. (Video by Skyler Ballard)







LEADVILLE • The twenties enter the store several hours late. Denver traffic was horrible, they say. They got stuck in the snow.

“We don’t want to talk about it,” said one. ” We are here. We are going to ski.

That’s exactly what the owner of Bill’s Ski Rentals likes to hear.

Paul Copper, 67, sports a megawatt smile as imposing as his physical presence. He rises from his seat, a bench made from a meat-cutting table from Camp Hale from World War II, the army serial number still visible.

“So okay!” Copper dams.

The guys get ready as the man behind one of Colorado’s oldest family ski shops cracks some of his usual jokes.

“Are you going to put those shoelaces on today, or are you going to need some help?” »

“Do you have a girlfriend? No? Do you understand why?”

We love the snowboard tutorial. “Okay. …Now stick out your thumb…smile…and like all other snowboarders, you just might get a ride!”

So goes another day to the shop opened by Paul’s father more than 75 years ago. It was Bill Copper, a ski culture legend who took off here with the soldiers-turned-industry pioneers of the 10th Mountain Division.

Paul carries on his late father’s legacy with aplomb. His wife of nearly 40 years, Dee Dee, helps on the weekends. Customers walk into the store, the walls lined with generations of family photos, and she says the same to him: “You’re up.”

“When he’s around people,” Dee Dee says, “it’s almost like a performance.”

But no, he’s the man she knew as a local waitress decades ago. “He would come to the restaurant, and he was always joking, teasing,” she said. “I would see him stop, and we had different sections, and I would say, ‘I hope he doesn’t sit in my section. “”

So fair warning if you’re stopping en route to the local ski resort or Interstate 70 resorts further out: you’ll have to put up with a few jokes. Paul Copper is as colorful as the store itself, red and blue, against the backdrop of his forest green 1976 Ford Explorer.

“You must know,” he said, “I have a lot of fun here.”

He likes to have fun like his father. Bill enjoyed racing burros – he and Bosco were champions in the 1950s – while Paul prefers skijoring, riding horses or skis from behind. Paul also likes mountain biking. He also likes the drums. He also loves scuba diving. He’s busy right now converting old vinyl to MP3.

But more than anything, Paul loves to ski. He skis almost every day. He’ll take care of the morning rush at the shop, leave with a sign on the door “gone skiing, you should be here with me” – and come back for the rush home at the end of the day.

“If they want to come back early,” he said, “I give them the suit for the front door, tell them to put their skis on the bench and the boots over there by the rack, and make sure you to lock the door when you leave.”

This can only happen in such a rare and old-fashioned store, increasingly hard to find in an increasingly saturated and corporatized industry. Dee Dee says she often hears it from clients who have rented elsewhere: “This one is totally different.

The gear is up to date — not the wooden skis and leather boots of the early days — but Bill’s is otherwise like it was in 1945.

With money from his military service at Leadville High School, Bill Copper opened his rental shop in the bustling Climax Mine. He soon moved into the barracks of what is now Ski Cooper, where the 10th Mountain Division trained for high mountain warfare in Europe.

Pete Seibert was one such ski soldier. He continued to build Vail into the 60s.

“He was a good friend of Dad’s,” Paul said. “He actually tried to convince my dad to set up a ski rental shop and a ski school” in Vail.

But Bill Copper was more than happy in Leadville, where the family had been rooted from the start. The family saw the mining boom that gave birth to the town and others in the valley: Gilman and Minturn, now abandoned, gone silent without the trains.

Before Bill’s, skiing here was simply a convenience, a way to get around. It was a way Bill knew well.

His biography at the Leadville/Lake County Sports Hall of Fame details his childhood of trekking with his father on Hagerman Pass to take water measurements:

“[T]he trip lasted three days. One day, one day to complete the tasks and the third to return. Intrepid skiers wore full-width skis tied at the tip, tarred with pine and coated with paraffin. In the absence of sunscreens at the time, men rubbed their skin with charcoal to avoid intense burns.

Seemingly brutal for today’s luxury skiers, but joyous for Bill Copper. He held these positions until the day Paul was born in 1954; the man rushed over the pass and returned for the birth of the boy.

As in the larger city, Bill instilled a love of skiing in his son at an early age.

“One of the things I remember when I was a kid, you know, so many people in Leadville were working in the mine, and he wanted to get them out,” Paul says. “He wanted them to enjoy what we’re living in, instead of just coming home from work and thinking, ‘Ugh, all this snow, I have to shovel it.’ He wanted to take them out and see what skiing was like.

For Paul and his siblings, skiing was the best. “I don’t think we ever got out of our pajamas from Friday morning to Monday morning. It was our long underwear,” he said.

It’s no wonder, then, that Paul joined the family business when his father’s health was failing. Bill Copper died in 1989.

But his shop lives. With that brilliant smile and bevy of jokes, Paul embodies the delight his father inspired in those family generations captured in photos hanging on the wall.

Up front, Paul keeps photos of the man who started it all.

Dee Dee hates saying that to her husband. “But I tell him: at some point, we have to decide when it’s time to stop doing this,” she says. “He’s not getting any younger. I am not getting any younger.

She would like them to spend more time with the children and grandchildren. They all live out of state.

“The hardest part is we don’t have a family member picking it up,” Dee Dee says. “We would probably be sold to a stranger who doesn’t know the story.”

Paul says he thought about selling. But he knows how the buyers are. “When you buy a business, you don’t want to pay what it’s worth,” he says.

This is the problem. For him, all this is priceless.

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Marnell “Marnie” Lena Reynolds | The independent daily on YourValley.net https://ohalloranco.com/marnell-marnie-lena-reynolds-the-independent-daily-on-yourvalley-net/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 19:00:01 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/marnell-marnie-lena-reynolds-the-independent-daily-on-yourvalley-net/ Marnell “Marnie” Lena Reynolds, 72, died Jan. 24, 2022, at Banner Goldfield Medical Center in Apache Junction, AZ, after a long and valiant battle with cancer. Marnie was the most cavalier, spirited, and excellent pioneer. She grew up in Princeton, Minnesota and graduated from Princeton High School in 1967. After graduation, she traveled to Arizona […]]]>

Marnell “Marnie” Lena Reynolds, 72, died Jan. 24, 2022, at Banner Goldfield Medical Center in Apache Junction, AZ, after a long and valiant battle with cancer.

Marnie was the most cavalier, spirited, and excellent pioneer. She grew up in Princeton, Minnesota and graduated from Princeton High School in 1967. After graduation, she traveled to Arizona to pursue her dreams of all things horse: training, horseback riding and pension. Marnie was a tireless worker and an outspoken advocate for all animals. More recently, she built the “Quarter Circle Boot Ranch” in 1994 from her blood, sweat and tears. The ranch sits at the foot of the Superstition Mountains and was her paradise on earth until she was admitted to hospital a few weeks ago. Like a real ranch, Marnie’s business has brought people from all walks of life together and she has enjoyed great respect for her considerable equestrian skills and expertise. Marnie developed strong friendships and received amazing help and support from special friends Jim, Sandy and Anne whom the family can’t thank enough.

Marnie remains a fond memory surrounding all who knew her. She is survived by her siblings, Tom (Sam) Reynolds and Carol (Craig) Nutt, Aunt Joyce Fritche, numerous cousins, nephews, nieces, great-nephews and nieces, friends, clients, dog Coyote, cat Rudy and several horses that continue to look after his friends.

She was predeceased by her beloved parents Erwin and Eleanor, her older brother David, her sister-in-law Sandy, her uncles Eugene, Erwin, Donald, Gerald and Roger Reynolds, her uncles Al, Roger and George Williams and his aunts Marjorie Embertson. and DeLoris Reynolds, and many, many special animals.

A family funeral service at Lakeside Cemetery in Spencer Brook Township, Minnesota will be scheduled at a later date.

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Former Giants pitcher offers insider appreciation of Barry Bonds https://ohalloranco.com/former-giants-pitcher-offers-insider-appreciation-of-barry-bonds/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 21:41:01 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/former-giants-pitcher-offers-insider-appreciation-of-barry-bonds/ John D’Acquisto knew Barry Bonds was destined for baseball greatness. Although MLB Home Run King Barry Bonds did not receive the Baseball Writers’ Association of America’s minimum 75% vote in his 10th and final year in their Hall of Fame ballot, the 14-times all -star and two-time National League batting champion should get another chance […]]]>

John D’Acquisto knew Barry Bonds was destined for baseball greatness.

Although MLB Home Run King Barry Bonds did not receive the Baseball Writers’ Association of America’s minimum 75% vote in his 10th and final year in their Hall of Fame ballot, the 14-times all -star and two-time National League batting champion should get another chance to be enshrined in Cooperstown.

The bonds, which received 66.0% of the BBWAA votes announced last Tuesday, are eligible for vote by Today’s Game Era committee next December. The ballot will be announced after the conclusion of the 2022 World Series.

For many, not having Bonds join this summer’s class at the Clark Sports Center on Sunday, July 24, is a bitter pill to swallow. Bonds, who has been linked to performance-enhancing drug use during his 22 decorated MLB seasons, did not become the 340th Hall member. That honor goes to former Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz.

Considering his personal stats, he has 762 home runs, 2,935 hits, 514 stolen bases and

Baseball card provided by John D’Acquisto

Baseball card provided by John D’Acquisto

2,558 walks (232 balls in a season), it seems not if, but when, Bonds gets a plaque posted at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown.

However, what many young fans of the game today either forget or haven’t been educated about, Bonds seemed destined to shine on the diamond.

For some, the most famous and successful father and son duo in MLB history are the Griffeys – Ken, Sr. and Ken, Jr. The latter being inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame (Class of 2016 ). Despite all their success, Barry’s baseball superiority surpasses, along with his late father Bobby Bonds, the Griffeys.

“He was extremely quick,” former San Francisco Giants left-handed pitcher John D’Acquisto said of teammate Bobby Bonds. “He was as close to a five-tool player as I’ve ever seen. And Bobby was a great defensive player.”

attachment-DonD_3170

John D’Acquisto in Cooperstown, New York. Photo by Don Laible for TSM.

D’Acquisto’s relationship with Bobby and Barry Bonds dates back to his first signing with the Giants from a San Diego high school as the first draft pick in 1970. Meetings during spring training and when he was called in San Francisco as the 21-year-old in September 1973, D’Acquisto gravitated to the budding superstar and his young son.

“(Bobby Bonds) had Willie Mays as a teacher. During the 1973 and 1974 seasons, Bobby was the leader of our teams,” D’Acquisto recalled in a recent phone conversation from his home in Arizona. “He was quite a talent. As far as outfielders go, we had Gary Matthews, Garry Maddox, Ken Henderson and Bobby in right field. And Bobby was a great point guard.”

In his 14 major league seasons, Bobby Bonds dominated at the top of the Giants’ roster. He ran 35 starting circuits. With the Giants from 1968 to 1974, Bonds, Sr. was the first player to record at least two seasons of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases. His 461 stolen bases, his multiple all-star selections (including the 1973 game MVP), Bonds was among the most dominant players in both leagues.

Success in athletics was in the Bonds family. Bobby’s brother Robert was an NFL draft pick and his sister Rosie was an American Olympic hurdler in the 1964 games.

PEDs aside, Barry Bonds had the genes to be a force in athletics.

As a young pitcher with the Giants, D’Acquisto vividly remembers his pre-game company with the future king of the league at Candlestick Park.

“I was ‘Uncle John’ at ‘BB’. That’s what people who know Barry call him. He’d be in the outfield with me during batting practice fucking balls; like my sidekick. I’d say to Barry, “You got one, so I’ll take one.”

Cover of the book, Fastball John, available on Amazon.
Cover of the book, Fastball John, available on Amazon.

Years later, when D’Acquisto was long retired from his decade of pitching in the National and American Leagues, the batting practice buddies reunited during the 2016 season in Phoenix. Predictably, both men were emotional when they were taken back to a simpler time in their lives years ago.

“I saw Barry at the batting cage,” D’Acquisto recalled when Bonds was the batting coach that season for the Florida Marlins. “So I went up to him and said, ‘Hey, BB’, remember in Candlestick Park fucking balls with John D’Acquisto? He did. I said, ” I am John D’Acquistro.”

42 years later, and the guys were back at hand. D’Acquisto recounts that Barry hugged him five times, delighted to see his innocence again.

“The little kid came back to him. We talked about the good old days. I asked how his mum was doing. I told stories about his dad. It was just a breath of fresh air for both of us. I could see the tears in his eyes. It was so special. That’s what baseball is about.”

Photo of John D’Acquisto with his artwork. Provided by John D’Acquisto.

Photo of John D’Acquisto with his artwork. Provided by John D’Acquisto.

Like many baseball fans, and Barry Bonds in particular, D’Acquisto hoped the former pirate and Pittsburgh giant got at least 75.0% of the BBWAA votes last week. D’Acquisto hopes to take his interest in Barry and his father to the next level by writing a book about them. No stranger to writing, D’Acquisto – Fastball John’s autobiography was released in 2016, which continues to receive critical acclaim.

Teammates of the St. Lucie Legends in 1989, one of the original eight franchises that played in the Senior Professional Baseball Association, D’Acquisto and Bonds, Sr., the relationship grew. But, D’Acquisto’s association with anyone connected to his time as a San Francisco giant remains special.

“In 1971, I walked into the Giants clubhouse as a 19-year-old kid, and locked myself in next to Willie Mays, right next to the coaches’ room,” D’Acquisto explains. seen entering Juan Marichal and Bobby (Bonds), then Ken Henderson (his father Joe Henderson was the scout who signed D’Acquisto). Gaylord Perry also came. After team practice, Bobby liked me very quickly. He told me what to do and what not to do; treat me like a son. We have become very close.”

During five years of watching Barry Bonds grow and Bobby Bonds dominate National League pitching, D’Acquisto soon learned that he was in the presence of quality people; a superstar and a superstar in waiting. Perhaps in a few months, finally, the Bonds name will be added to the roll call of Hall of Fame baseball immortality. Count on D’Acquisto to lead the applause.

Don Laible is a freelance sportswriter from the Mohawk Valley, now living in Florida. He has reported on professional baseball and hockey for print, radio and the web since the 1980s. His columns are featured weekly on WIBX950.com. Don can be contacted by email at Don@icechipsdiamonddust.com.

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Fox Host Failla hits the US from WIBX studio in Utica

The Fox Across America host with Jimmy Failla, which airs coast-to-coast and on WIBX 950 and 106.9 FM weekdays from noon to 3 a.m., was in Utica this past weekend. Jimmy Failla appeared on the Keeler in the morning show on Friday morning December 3, 2021, then did his national show on FOX News Radio from the WIBX studio.

Failla is a former NYC taxi driver turned comedian and over the weekend performed 4 sold-out shows at Utica’s Fat Katz Comedy Club in Washington Mills.

Check out some shots from the weekend.

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Annual Red Bluff bull and gelding sale hopes to return to pre-COVID numbers | News https://ohalloranco.com/annual-red-bluff-bull-and-gelding-sale-hopes-to-return-to-pre-covid-numbers-news/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 06:37:35 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/annual-red-bluff-bull-and-gelding-sale-hopes-to-return-to-pre-covid-numbers-news/ Organizers are following COVID protocols so everyone can enjoy the sale as they have for over 80 years. RED BLUFF, Calif. – Tuesday, the first day of the 81st The annual Red Bluff bull and gelding sale was held at the Tehama District Fairgrounds. The event will last until Saturday and will be full of […]]]>

Organizers are following COVID protocols so everyone can enjoy the sale as they have for over 80 years.



RED BLUFF, Calif. – Tuesday, the first day of the 81st The annual Red Bluff bull and gelding sale was held at the Tehama District Fairgrounds.

The event will last until Saturday and will be full of a variety of events to accompany the sale of hundreds of working bulls, horses and dogs.








People from all over the western United States came to the fairgrounds to settle in for the busy week.

After seeing a drop in attendance and profits over the past two years due to COVID-19, the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale hopes to return to normal this year.

BJ Macfarlane is the manager of Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale and says that although the event is mostly outdoors, the organization is following COVID guidelines to ensure everyone has a safe week.

Macfarlane is happy to bring the sale back to Red Bluff and hopes if the sale can return to normal it will help surrounding businesses.

“This community needs these events to be successful and stay in business, especially after the past two years,” Macfarlane said. “The community supports this event 300% which is great and fun to work with this community on this event.”

Tuesday was also a preparation day for vendors to set up their booths for the trade show that takes place throughout the week.

Vendors at the event sell items such as clothing, food, handmade crafts, farming equipment, and more.

Vera Adams had a stand at the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale for just over a decade.

She said COVID has been tough for all vendors, but most are finding ways to bounce back after two tough years.

“The rebound from that, I think, has been very strong for most small businesses,” Adams said. “I think for some people it’s still been difficult, but we’ve seen an increase in sales over the past few months, so it’s been promising and we’ll see how it goes in the future.”

The full sale begins Wednesday and includes the opening of the Tehama County Cattlewomen Western Art Exhibit and a youth raffle that supports a variety of community youth organizations and high school rodeo competitions.

A week-long schedule of all events can be found here.

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He is back! Legendary Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo Returns After Pandemic Exile https://ohalloranco.com/he-is-back-legendary-fort-worth-stock-show-rodeo-returns-after-pandemic-exile/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 23:12:08 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/he-is-back-legendary-fort-worth-stock-show-rodeo-returns-after-pandemic-exile/ The Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo has long used the famous slogan “This thing is legendary”. And, finally, after a year on the shelf due to the pandemic, the legend is back in business at Will Rogers Memorial Center and Dickies Arena. The 2022 Stock Show & Rodeo begins Friday and runs through February […]]]>

The Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo has long used the famous slogan “This thing is legendary”. And, finally, after a year on the shelf due to the pandemic, the legend is back in business at Will Rogers Memorial Center and Dickies Arena.

The 2022 Stock Show & Rodeo begins Friday and runs through February 5, offering millions of stock prizes and bounties, plus a $1 million+ purse at the PRCA Tournament at Dickie’s Arena

“We are already feeling the excitement of our fans for The Stock Show,” said FWSSR President and CEO Brad Barnes. “Ticket sales were very strong, with many of our rodeo and concert shows nearly sold out, and admissions to our cattle and horse shows were also at high levels.”

“Clearly, the return to the Stock Show is on the calendar for thousands of people across the state and across the country,” he said.

There will be 25 rodeo performances at Dickies Arena. These include:

  • Friday-Saturday (January 14-15) Best of West Ranch Rodeo.
  • Sunday (January 16) Best of Mexico Celebraciòn.
  • Monday (January 17) Cowboys of Color Rodeo.
  • Tuesday-Wednesday (January 18-19) Bulls’ Night Out Xtreme Bull Riding.
  • And, of course, the FWSSR Pro Rodeo tournament from January 21 to February 5.

Among the legions who are happy to see the return of the Stock Show & Rodeo is Fort Worth Councilman Leonard Firestone, who represents the council district (District 7) that includes the Stock Show grounds.

“I was out there the other day doing the Chisholm challenge,” Firestone said. “It was so great to be there, to walk around. There was a sense of normalcy again. It’s such an important part of Fort Worth’s history. So many people go to see our beautiful city and all the wonderful things we have to offer.

“Also, don’t forget the economic impact, over $100 million. Hotels, bars, restaurants, the hospitality industry, it means so much to them to get it back.

Building on the celebration of the state’s Hispanic roots, the FWSSR Texas Invitational Mariachi Competition returns to showcase the best high school mariachi teams from across the state. The Stock Show has also expanded the beauty of the women’s tag team competition from Escaramuza to include the thrilling Charro Cala, featuring Alejandro Goñi Rojo, one of Mexico’s top horse and Cala trainers.

Horse racing enthusiasts will also enjoy the return of the popular Mustang Magic, as well as Mustang Showcase training clinics. Collegiate teams from Texas and Arkansas will help launch “Bridles and Brains,” a new concept in collegiate ranch horse competition that challenges both equestrian and communication skills.

The Moo-seum Experience grants visitors to the Stock Show access to nearby museums, courtesy of Central Market. General admission to the Stock Show will also include access to the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame, the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and the Cattle Raisers Museum.

Among the activities available at these museums will be “Enter the Stock Show,” a joint effort between the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and the Stock Show. Collaborative curatorial combines artifacts, videos and images provided by the Stock Show with technologies used by the Museum of Science and History to give visitors a unique look at the history and contemporary livestock exhibit .

Following the successful launch of its Auditorium concert series in 2020, the Stock Show has expanded the series to feature Grammy and Oscar-winning artists including; legendary rock band, Kansas; alternative country music group The Old 97’s; country music artist Clint Black; comedian Jeff Foxworthy; the Fort Worth Symphony, with vocalist Tony Vincent performing Queen’s music; and Ryan Bingham.

Meanwhile, the ever-popular traditional Stock Show entertainment options are also back. Thousands of animals will be on display this year competing for millions in auction and bounty revenue. Acres of “rodeo shopping” will include everything from fashion to farm equipment.

Family fun includes the Mattress Firm Petting Zoo, Children’s Barnyard, Carnival Midway, Texas Farm Bureau Insurance’s Planet Agriculture, and the ever-popular Milking Parlor.

Food is always a favorite with everything from corn dogs to cotton candy and cuisine fit for kings and queens at Reata at the Backstage or Reata at the Rodeo. Visitors can also relax with a glass of wine at the Corkyard or enjoy a beer and some tunes at the Bud Light Roadhouse.

Livestock auctions, one of the oldest features of the Stock Show, still include a variety of breeds of beef cattle. Sales begin on Saturday (January 15).

A total of 17 Stock Show auctions generated more than $8.8 million in trade when the show was held in 2020.

The Southwest Show Invitational Commercial Heifer Show and Sale will feature females with terrific genetics in multiple breeds, drawing a crowd of standing-only bidders. Senders of the sale are vying for $14,000 in bonuses, coveted banners, rosettes and all-important bragging rights ahead of the sale.

Additionally, the Sales President, Sales Manager, and Shippers offer a scholarship program that typically awards $12,000 to $14,000 each year.

“We are honored that these cattle breed associations have chosen the Stock Show as the host for their best sales,” said Stefan Marchman, Stock Show’s Breeding Manager. “We expect the auction to be dynamic as breeders seek to complement or improve their herd genetics with these exceptional animals.”

Livestock sales during the Stock Show will include:

  • Saturday (January 15), 11 a.m., Premier Texas Longhorn.
  • Saturday (January 15), 5 p.m., Premier Cowtown Elite Santa Gertrudis.
  • Sunday (January 16), 5 p.m., National Braunvieh.
  • January 21, noon, Best of the West Angus Bull.
  • January 22, noon, Stars of Texas Angus Female.
  • January 28, 3 p.m. Cowtown Cattle Drive Charolais.
  • January 29, 5 p.m., Cowtown Classic Simmental.
  • Jan. 30, 1 p.m., 52nd Annual Hereford Powerhouse.
  • February 5, 3:30 p.m., Southwestern Exposition Invitational 35th Annual Commercial Heifer.

Buyers in the market for a regal American quarter horse will find plenty to choose from at the Saturday and Sunday horse sales (January 15-16) in conjunction with Ranching Heritage Weekend.

The highly anticipated Heritage Sale, highlighted by the American Quarter Horse Association’s Best of the Remuda Sale, begins Saturday in the John Justin Arena. The sale will feature 38 ranch geldings, broodmares, future stallions and top ranch yearlings who have been recognized by AQHA as one of the top ranch horse breeders.

Also on Saturday will be the 65th Annual Select Breeders Quarter Horse Sale, offering premium riding horses from invited breeders for consignment.

On Sunday, interested buyers will have the opportunity to see 10 outstanding ranch horse geldings compete in the Invitational Ranch Horse Show and Sale at Will Rogers Coliseum. The best geldings will be judged at the event, which will include ranch reining and cattle work. They will then be auctioned immediately after the contest.

“These sales feature some of the finest horses produced by these famous ranches,” said Lauren Lovelace-Murray, Stock Show Horse Show Manager. “For anyone looking for a solid competition or breeding prospect, these are the sales to be had.”

For more event and ticket information, visit the FWSSR website.

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Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Celebrations Revealed: Contest, Baking Contest, Palace Parties and More https://ohalloranco.com/queens-platinum-jubilee-celebrations-revealed-contest-baking-contest-palace-parties-and-more/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:19:19 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/queens-platinum-jubilee-celebrations-revealed-contest-baking-contest-palace-parties-and-more/ January 10, 2022 – 11:19 GMT Diane shipley The Queen will celebrate her 70th birthday since taking the throne in February An incredible program of events has been unveiled to celebrate the queen’s platinum jubilee This year. On February 6, she will become the first British monarch to celebrate her 70th birthday on the throne. […]]]>





Diane shipley



An incredible program of events has been unveiled to celebrate the queen’s platinum jubilee This year. On February 6, she will become the first British monarch to celebrate her 70th birthday on the throne.

SEE: Queen celebrates Kate Middleton’s 40th birthday with beautiful family photos

There will be many special occasions and initiatives throughout the year, including the celebration of the Platinum Jubilee from May 12 to 15, during which 1000 artists and 500 horses will mark important moments in royal history through a 90 minute performance that will feature actors, musicians and global equestrian shows.

In summer, there will be a four-day bank holiday weekend, from Thursday June 2 to Sunday June 5.

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WATCH: The Queen makes her first official engagement since Remembrance Sunday missing

On June 2, the Queen’s annual parade, Color parade, will be a spectacular event, with the participation of 1200 officers, as well as musicians from the army and horses. Tickets to attend will be available by public ballot on the qbp.army.mod.uk website.

READ: Why the Queen let Princess Anne live in the highest royal palace in her place

MORE: The Queen’s Favorite Lunch That Makes Her Look So Young

On the same day, celebratory beacons will be lit in 1,500 towns, cities and towns across the UK, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man and the British Overseas Territories.

On Friday June 3 there will be a service of thanksgiving for the Queen’s reign at St Paul’s Cathedral and on Saturday June 4, Buckingham Palace will welcome the BBC’s Platinum Party at the Palace, a live concert featuring big names in entertainment with a ballot for the opening of tickets in February.

queen-parade-outfit

The Queen has a lot to look forward to in 2022

Sunday June 5 is the date of the Big Jubilee Lunch, with over 200,000 neighborhood events expected.

During this weekend, the Platinum Jubilee Pageant will see artists, dancers, musicians, servicemen, key workers and volunteers tell the story of the Queen’s reign through a combination of theater, music, circus and street performance.

A special River of Hope section will feature two hundred silk flags that appear as a moving river, with a section made up of children’s hopes for the planet that will be carried by high school students.

musicians-windsor

Last year Trooping the Color took place at Windsor Castle

There will also be events the public can participate in throughout the year, including the Queen’s Green Canopy, which sees green-fingered communities across the country plant trees to celebrate the Queen’s seven decades of service. .

The initiative is also working to protect 70 valuable old-growth trees and forests and to launch a training program to teach unemployed young people tree planting techniques.

The Platinum Pudding competition, meanwhile, will ask UK residents aged eight and over to creation of a new pudding dedicated to the queen.

buckingham palace shopping center

The Platinum Jubilee Pageant will make its way along the mall

Five finalists will prepare their dessert for a jury of experts including Dame Mary Berry, Monica Galetti and Buckingham Palace chef Mark Flanagan, with the winning recipe made available to the public.

SEE: Royals wearing tiaras for the first time – 12 sparkly photos

Three special exhibitions marking the Queen’s accession, Coronation and Jubilees will be held in the official royal residences from July, with portraits of Her Majesty and items of her personal jewelry on display at Buckingham Palace, the coronation dress and the dress of succession at Windsor Castle and the outfits worn by Her Majesty to celebrate the silver, gold and diamond jubilees on display at the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

Celebrations will also take place on the private estates of the Queen, Sandringham and Balmoral, for local residents and visitors, including a free screening of the Platinum Party at the Palace in Royal Sandringham Park.

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Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo return in 2022 with new attractions, traditional favorites – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://ohalloranco.com/fort-worth-stock-show-and-rodeo-return-in-2022-with-new-attractions-traditional-favorites-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 02:47:33 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/fort-worth-stock-show-and-rodeo-return-in-2022-with-new-attractions-traditional-favorites-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Rodeo fans and thousands of Texas 4-H and FFA youths await the start of the 125th Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo as it begins its 23-day run on January 14. According to FWSSR officials, the Stock Show sets the tone for the season of professional rodeo and cattle competitions as it offers millions of […]]]>


Rodeo fans and thousands of Texas 4-H and FFA youths await the start of the 125th Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo as it begins its 23-day run on January 14.

According to FWSSR officials, the Stock Show sets the tone for the season of professional rodeo and cattle competitions as it offers millions of cattle scholarships and bonuses as well as a purse of over $ 1 million for the ProRodeo tournament.

“We are already feeling the enthusiasm of our fans for The Stock Show,” said FWSSR President and CEO Brad Barnes. “Ticket sales have been very strong with many of our rodeo shows and concerts nearing sold out, and registrations for our cattle and horse competitions have also been at high levels. Obviously, the return to the Stock Show is on the calendar for thousands of people. people across the state and across the country. “

Rodeo returns to Dickies Arena where 25 rodeo performances give fans the chance to take in the sights, sounds and excitement of the iconic celebration of the Western way of life in Fort Worth, FWSSR officials said.

Stock Show rodeos include Best of the West Ranch Rodeo (January 14-15), Best of Mexico Celebraciòn (January 16), Cowboys of Color Rodeo (January 17), Bulls’ Night Out Xtreme Bull Riding (January 18) and 19), Texas Champions Challenge Rodeo (January 20) and the FWSSR PRORODEO tournament (January 21 – February 5).

Following the successful debut of its Auditorium concert series in 2020, the Stock Show has expanded the series to feature Grammy and Oscar-winning artists including legendary rock band Kansas, alternative country music group The Old 97’s, the Country music artist Clint Black, comedian Jeff Foxworthy, the Fort Worth Symphony with singer Tony Vincent performing Queen’s Music, and Ryan Bingham.

The FWSSR Texas Invitational Mariachi competition will also be returning to feature the best high school mariachi teams from across the state, FWSSR officials said.

Officials said the Stock Show has also expanded to the Escaramuza women’s exercise team competition to include the thrilling Charro Cala, starring Alejandro Goñi Rojo, one of Mexico’s top horse and Cala trainers. .

Equestrian competition enthusiasts will also appreciate the return of the popular Mustang Magic competition, as well as the Mustang Showcase training clinics.

Officials say collegiate ranch horse teams from Texas and Arkansas will enter a new competition at the launch of “Bridles and Brains,” a new concept of collegiate ranch horse competition that puts the horses to the test. equestrian and communication skills.

Fans of Stock Show will enjoy the Moo-seum experience which gives access to nearby museums, courtesy of the Central Market.

General admission to the Stock Show will also include access to the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame, the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and the Cattle Raisers Museum, officials said.

Among the activities available at these museums will be “Enter the Stock Show,” the most recent joint effort between the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and the Stock Show. The collaboration combines artifacts, videos and images provided by the Stock Show with technologies used by the Museum of Science and History to offer museum visitors a unique look at history and the contemporary exhibit on the livestock.

According to FWSSR officials, while there is plenty of new stuff in store for 2022, the Stock Show’s traditional entertainment options remain popular.

Breeding and horse shows are central to the identity of the Stock Show, and thousands of animals will be on display this year competing for millions of auction proceeds and bonuses, officials said.

Acres of “rodeo shopping” that includes everything from fashion to farm equipment.

Family entertainment will also be available with options such as the Mattress Firm petting zoo, children’s barnyard, Carnival Midway, Texas Farm Bureau Insurance’s Planet Agriculture, and the milking parlor.

Ticket information can be found here.


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Disappeared Streaming Mode https://ohalloranco.com/disappeared-streaming-mode/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:19:09 +0000 https://ohalloranco.com/disappeared-streaming-mode/ Over ten years ago, I interviewed Molly Ringwald for an article in the Los Angeles Times. We sat at a bohemian garden cafe in Venice and crossed our legs in tandem to discuss its lavish return to comedy and the city itself. Or at least she thought so. Me? Of course, I had questions about […]]]>


Over ten years ago, I interviewed Molly Ringwald for an article in the Los Angeles Times. We sat at a bohemian garden cafe in Venice and crossed our legs in tandem to discuss its lavish return to comedy and the city itself. Or at least she thought so. Me? Of course, I had questions about her long absence from Hollywood and her Brat Pack arc ingenue to middle-aged TV mom. But secretly and selfishly, I wanted to know one thing: who made those insanely bitchy brown equestrian boots that she wore in The breakfast club?

Cinema has always been my northern star when it comes to style. Please don’t ask me about the hot pink lace-up that I wore as a headband for most of 1983, thanks to valley girl. Or the way I dressed like Faye Dunaway’s Bonnie and Clyde, in a camel beret, a tight knit sweater and a flowy pencil skirt, for more than a few magazine interviews in New York in the mid-twenties. “We’re robbing banks,” I thought to myself in reassurance as I sat in the elegant and intimidating halls.

I am hardly alone. In 1934, when Clark Gable avoided an undershirt in the classic romp It happened one night, the men took note. Sales of undershirts have reportedly plummeted. Audrey Hepburn’s sleeveless black scabbard in Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 1961 made the little black dress a wardrobe staple. Thirty years later, women like me were feverishly looking for the crisp white button-down shirt and cropped black pants, finally a femme fatale look for the workplace! pulp Fiction.

This article appeared in the Winter 2022 issue of Alta Journal.
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Fashion designers, too, often see genre films as inspirations for collections and catwalks. Jeremy Scott, the Creative Director of Moschino, once told me that Blade runner had a “profound” influence on its aesthetics. Five years ago, Parisian designer Olympia Le-Tan showed off a varsity sweater emblazoned with the word “Psycho” and a belt buckle inspired by a shower nozzle during her fall runway show. Do you feel Hitchcock, anyone?

But a recent confluence of forces, both unforeseen and unstoppable, is now mitigating the impact of the big screen on what is required. “Cinema isn’t as influential as it used to be and not just because of the pandemic,” costume designer Janie Bryant said with a sigh. Bryant rocked the style of the era from 2007 to 2015 with his work on Mad Men. (FYI: My husband started wearing a damn fedora for his poker night.) The comic book franchises own the multiplex, Bryant notes. At least 10 superhero movies are expected to arrive in 2022. And look, who wouldn’t want the power of invisibility in a tense family reunion or the ability to fly away from their brooding tween? But that doesn’t mean we want to dress like Batman at Thanksgiving dinner or show up on a first date in a starry bustier and red pants like Wonder Woman. “These films are primarily aimed at teenagers,” says Bryant. “Where are the epic costume dramas?” “

Steven Knight, the creator of “Peaky Blinders,” has launched a clothing line called Garrison Tailors which is inspired by the look of his show.

BBC

On request, it is there. If the video killed the radio star, streamers behead movie studios and play Parcheesi with their eyeballs. Take the drama from Netflix’s blockbuster period Bridgerton, for example. Its effect on fashion was undeniable from the start. Vogue announcement, “Bridgerton-Worthy Runway seems to inspire your own “coming out” style. Indeed, the Spring 2021 shows were teeming with the type of dress that should come with a porcelain ensemble and a side of sour cream. London-based designer label Erdem showed off flowery puff-sleeve dresses reminiscent of the Regency era of the early 1800s, while Simone Rocha highlighted back flourishes like tulle, Empire waist, and chunky knots. And with some 7,500 period pieces created by Bridgerton costume designer Ellen Mirojnick for the first season, the frilly inspirations were not lacking to glean.

Peaky blinders creator Steven Knight was probably inspired by Mad Men Fashion craze when he launched a clothing line called Garrison Tailors in 2016 to sell the haberdashery seen in his period detective drama, another streamer hit. Want to access the look? Knight’s tweed baker’s cap sells for around $ 95 on the Garrison Tailors website, while a well-lined tweed suit and vest costs around $ 900. “A lot of people seem to admire the look of the Peaky boys and it’s hard to find clothes of the same quality and cut in conventional stores and outlets,” Knight notes on the website. He highlights one of the reasons television eclipses cinema when it comes to influencing our style: the characters come into our homes and live with us week after week. They are like a family.

Hbo max's Gossip Girl reboot leans heavily on luxury fashion, its predecessor had teens rushing to the mall to mimic the looks and made preppy headbands popular, a trend that hasn't faded.

HBO Max’s reboot of “Gossip Girl” leans heavily on luxury fashion. Its predecessor had teens running to the mall to mimic the looks and made preppy headbands popular, a trend that hasn’t faded away.

Karolina Wojtasik / HBO Max

THE TIKTOK EFFECT

But fashion, like Hollywood, sees young people as its most valuable consumers. Teenage girls are actually credited with leading the recent spending rebound. (Did anyone else hear that mic drop?) And this dewy demo doesn’t nibble on movie theater popcorn. He’s hanging out on TikTok. For the uninitiated, the video app outshines Instagram’s cousin who shows up at the party with a messy bun and a stain on her jumpsuit. According to the Business of Apps industry analyst, 69% of American teens currently use TikTok. There are over 42 million young people between the ages of 10 and 19 in the United States.

Big fashion houses like Louis Vuitton and Saint Laurent did the math. They now broadcast their parades on the platform; designers even encourage social media users to recreate their look with tutorials. The stars of TikTok launch their own fashion brands or also collaborate on capsule collections, and become our next movie stars. (More on that later.)

Speaking of the power of adolescence, we have to talk about the HBO Max streamer Gossip Girl reboot and how this TV show also hijacked the fashion headlines. The original 2007 melodrama about private New York schoolchildren named Blair and Serena who had the disposable income of hedge fund managers made preppy headbands a thing – and the trend is still alive, thanks to the show. (I just typed “Blair Waldorf headbands” on Amazon and found 297 options.) Gossip Girl leaned heavily on fashion and sent teens rushing to the mall in a way no other show had in a generation. This time around, however, the hype has come to a head. before the debut, thanks, in part, to the return of the series’ OG costume designer, Eric Daman. However, today’s teens may have to dissolve their college funds to dress. Characters on the new Gossip Girl wear Balenciaga sneakers for $ 950 and Louis Vuitton tote bags for $ 3,500.

Without a doubt, the influence of TV on fashion is also fueled by big budgets to present expensive labels that will impress teens. “These high-profile shows have so much money to spend on the wardrobe,” says Denise Wingate, the costume designer who oversaw the appearance of the teenage film Pygmalion. She is all that in 1999 and his recent reboot of Netflix, He is all that. In the new version, the teenage protagonist is a social media influencer who happens to be played by one of TikTok’s biggest stars, Addison Rae. (The performer’s style status was cemented last September when she sat front row at the Versace show in Milan.) Rae has around 85 million followers on the platform, and afterwards He is all that, she signed a multi-picture contract with Netflix to develop and star in future projects. Simply put, our new movie stars really are the girls next door, if they’re making style videos in their bedrooms, of course.

“I didn’t even know who Addison was,” Wingate laughs. Nonetheless, she bought outfits for He is all that affordable brands popular on TikTok, like American Eagle, Alo and LA’s own reworked vintage brand, iamkoko.la, which collaborated with Rae on a capsule collection of clothing. Influencer TikTok’s own line of hoodies ($ 45) and crop tops ($ 25) that simply reads “Obsessed” is sold out on her website. For looks in He is all that, accessible brands won out over ambitious labels – what is the raison d’être of TikTok, right?

So, would Molly Ringwald’s riding boots be so coveted if she indulged in “Iko Iko” on TikTok while wearing them? Not for me. When i looked The breakfast club, I bought an image, not an accessory. I wanted to be the girl who could apply lipstick with her cleavage and give one of her precious diamond earrings to the bad boy in high school. I still do.

By the way, the boots were designed by Ralph Lauren. •


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